Journal 45
Journal 44
Journal 43
Journal 42

Journal 45, 1999

This is how the editor describes the volume:

"Celebration and agony." This rather contradictory expression captures the content of this issue of The Uganda Journal, accurately reflecting a pervasive and fundamental tension within Ugandan society.

There is, on the one hand, in many of the contributions, a sense of Uganda’s good luck and blessedness, so well-captured by Francis Musango in just seven words: " . . .  Uganda is a land rich and beautiful." At the same time there is the widespread feeling that Uganda has failed to realize her enormous potential (economically, politically, socially and culturally) and seems most of the time to display the more ugly side of her face.

The lead article by A.B.K. Kasozi highlights the fundamental tension well. His basic argument is that Uganda has been failed by politics and political economy, as reflected in unequal economic and social development between the northern and southern regions of the country. He places the imperative for more uniform development throughout the country as the most urgent item on the national agenda if we are to avoid continued serious political conflicts and civil wars. This thesis has been repeatedly advanced before, but in arguing it by blaming the failure of politics and political economy largely on one leader, Dr. Kasozi is bound to generate controversy.

A major obstacle to Uganda’s economic growth and development is clearly the burden of external debt. Ulrike Wilson succeeds admirably in laying bare for the non-expert what is a terribly complex subject. Her piece is a good starting point of entry into what is happening to Uganda’s debt burden.

Arsene M. Balihuta discussed education as both a social service and a vital social capital for economic development, thereby complementing the previous two articles.

Both Herbert S. Kanabi Nsubuga and William Gombya-Ssembajjwe are concerned with sustainable development; the former focuses on what he considers the hitherto neglected field of animal industry, the latter on forestry. In both cases Uganda’s potential is shown to be enormous. And in both cases the country has a long way to go to begin to realize this potential. The gap between the potential and its realization in resource utilization widens further when considered in the context of the present land law. In a brief note, Jossy R Bibangambah explains clearly where the land law now stands and what needs to be done if land is to assume its rightful place as the primary capital for sustainable economic development.

The theme of "celebration and agony" is sharply dramatized in two short reflections on art. Gamaliel Mugumbya strongly argues for a role for art in overall development. Francis Musango, echoing a line from the musical Camelot urges Ugandan artists and Ugandans at large to "do look around" us. We would, he says, find that Uganda’s landscape is unique. His piece "wakes up" our landscape to display its beauty and at the same time wakes us up to notice that " . . .  Uganda is a land rich and beautiful."

Notes on Contributors

Editor's Note

Articles

  1. Regional inequality in Uganda Could Lead to Sociial Conflict; A.B.K. Kasozi
  2. Multilateral Debt Relief In Uganda; Ulrike Wilson
  3. Educational Provisions and Outcomes in Uganda: 1845-1997; Arsene M. Balihuta
  4. Policy Issues in Uganda's Animal Industry - A Historical perspective; Prof. Herbert S. Kanabi Nsubuga
  5. Institutions and Sustainable Forest management; Dr. William Gombya-Ssembajjwe
  6. The Royal Capitals of the Interlacastrine Kingdoms: An Urban Legacy for Uganda; Cato Lund

Notes

  1. A Socio-Economic Evaluation of Uganda's 1998 Land Act; J.R. Bibangambah
  2. Reflections of Art and Development; Gamaliel Mugumbya
  3. Art: The Allure of Local landscapes; Francis Musango

Obituary: Guy Yeoman 1920-1998 Henry Osmaston

Book Reviews

Uganda Bibliography 1998 Thomas P. Ofcansky

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Journal Volume 44, December 1997

Notes on Contributors

Editor's Note

Articles

  1. Colonial Treaties and the Legal Regime of the Nile Valley: Rethinking the Legal Framework into the Twenty-First Century (Part II), John Ntambirweki
  2. To Be or Not to Be: The Precarious Status of Parliaments in the "Transition to Democracy" in East Africa, A.G.G. Gingyera-Pinycwa
  3. An Ambiguity in the 1995 Constitution Concerning the Creation of New Districts in Uganda, Philip W. Rosemann
  4. Implementation of Value Added Tax: Lessons From the First Year–July 1996 to June 1997, Justin Zake
  5. A.M. Obote Revisited: A Review Article, Balam Nyeko
  6. Who Actually Was Emin Pasha? A German Explorer’s Contribution to the Birth of Modern Uganda, Volker Riehl
  7. Health Practices in Uganda, Peter Cowley

Notes

  1. The Anguish of Northern Uganda (extracts from a report), Robert Gersony
  2. Main Strands in the Debate about Land Ownership in Uganda
  3. What Did We Bring of Beijing to Uganda: An Introduction to the Fourth World Conference onWomen (FWCW) Held in Beijing, China, 4 – 15 September 1995, Margaret Snyder
  4. The NGO Perspective at the 4th UN World Conference on Women, Geraldine Bitamazire
  5. The Meaning of Beijing for Higher Education in Uganda, Joy Kwesiga
  6. Impertives for International Donor Action, Elizabeth Kharono

Book Reviews

  1. Two Hundred Years of Uganda – All in One Book! Uganda Almanac and Record Book, Timothy Kalyegira
  2. The Life of Prince Badru Kakungulu Wasajja (by A.B.K. Kasozi) Abu K. Mayanja
  3. Uganda’s Poorly Kept Secrets (by Charles Onyango Obbo) Justus Mugaju
  4. Kampala Women Getting By: Well-being in the Time of AIDs (by Sandra Wallman), Robert Kibuuka
  5. Fate of the Banished (by Julius Ocwinyo), Tabaire Bernard

Uganda Bibliography 1988-89, Thomas Ofcansky

Letters to the Editor

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Journal Volume 43, December 1996

Notes on Contributors

Editor’s Note

Articles

  1. Commemorating the 1995 Constitution of the Republic of Uganda: One Step Forward, How Many Steps Back?, J. Oloka-Onyango
  2. Land Tenure Relations in Uganda, 1900-95, Apolo R. Nsibambi
  3. Colonial Treaties and the Legal Regime of the Nile Valley: Rethinking the Legal Framework into the Twenty-First Century, with Special Emphasis on Uganda’s Interests, John Ntambirweki
  4. Some Thoughts on Ancient Historical Dimensions of Curent Conflicts intheGreater Kivu Region, David Lee Schoenbrun
  5. Reflections on Church and Politics in Uganda, Akiiki B. Mujaju
  6. Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia Crassipes) In Uganda Waters: Its Problems and the Means of Control, F.L. Orach-Meza

Notes

  1. What is Special Needs Education with Reference to Uganda? Mary Stella Atim
  2. Special Needs Education in Uganda: The Creation of the Uganda National Institute of Special Education (UNISE), Edward Kasolo Kimuli
  3. Special Needs Education inUganda: The Creation of EARS or Educational Assessment and Resource Services, Veronica K. Mpagi
  4. The Uganda Writers association (UWA), Frank Anywar
  5. Architecture in Uganda: Are Any Old Buildings Worth Saving? G.W. Katatumba and Vivian Craddock Williams

Book Reviews

  1. Sowing the Mustard Seed (by H.E. Yoweri Kaguta Museveni), Sabiiti Makara
  2. Looking Back at the Uganda Protectorage: Recollections of District Officers (edited by Doublas and Marcelle V. Brown), A.G.G. Gingyera-Pinycwa
  3. Politics, Constitutionalism and Electioneering in Uganda: A Study of the 1994 Constituent Assembly Elections (edited by Sabiti-Makara, Geoffrey B. Tukahebwa and Foster Byarugaba), Edward Kirumira
  4. Uganda: The Crisis of Confidence (by A.M. Kirunda-Kivejinja), William Muhumuza
  5. Religion, Ethnicity and Politics in Uganda (by Dan M. Mudoola), Robert Jatemwa and Frederick Ssali
  6. The First Daughter (by Goretti Kyomuhendo), Robert Jatemwa
  7. Street Children: Why Are They Out? (by Geoffey Steven Kyeyune), Robert Jatemwa

Uganda Bibliography 1985-87, Thomas Ofcansky

Letters to the Editor

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Journal Volume 42, December 1995

Notes on Contributors

Editor’s Note

Articles

  1. Uganda’s Response to the Challenge of HIV/AIDs, Omwony Ojwok and John Rwomushana
  2. A Review of the Economic History of Uganda’s Progress under its Structural Adjustment Programme, Mark J. Ellyne
  3. Sacred Forests in Modern Ganda Society, Gombya Sembajwe
  4. New Sources on the Nile Controversy: The Letters of Capt. Sir Richard Burton, Donald A. Young
  5. The Women’s Movement in Uganda, Joy Kwesiga
  6. Prospects for the Dairy Industry in Uganda, Herbert S.K. Nsubuga

Notes

  1. The Islamic University in Uganda, Mahdi Adam
  2. The Uganda Martyrs University, Michel Lejeune
  3. Bugema University, Moses L. Golola
  4. The Christian University in Uganda, Epraim Nsubuga
  5. Recent Archaeological Research in South-Western Uganda 1985-94, E.R. Kamuhangire

Book Reviews

  1. St. Paul’s Cathedral Namirembe (by Karen Moon), Rev. John Kalimi
  2. Religion and Politics in East Africa (edited by H.B. Hansen and Michael Twaddle), Justus Mugaju
  3. The Social Origins of Violence (by A.B.K. Kasozi), Akiiki Mujaju
  4. Uganda: Landmarks in Rebuilding a Nation (edited by P. Langseth, J. Katorobo, E. Brett and J. Munene), Justus Mugaju
  5. Uganda: Studies in Living Conditions, Popular Movements and Constitutionalism (edited by Mahmood Mamdani and Joe Oloka-Onyango), A.G.G. Gingyera-Pinycwa

Bibliographies on Uganda since 1974, Olivia M. Mutibwa

Obituary: Edison Wamara Rugumayo

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