UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA - AFRICAN STUDIES CENTER
African Studies Courses Given at Penn

African Studies Courses Given at Penn

African Studies (AFST)

SM 018. (ANTH 018) Ritual Worlds.
Barnes. Freshman Seminar.
An examination of the relationship between ritual, ideology, and symbolic representatives in societies around the world with emphasis on Africa using some of the anthropological classics.

022. (ECON 022) Topics in Economic Development: Africa.
Staff. Prerequisite(s): ECON 1 and 2.
Survey of existing theories of economic development and policy issues in less developed countries. Among the topics to be covered: labor surplus and two-gap models of development; problem of employment and income distribution; trade, macroeconomics, and agricultural policies in selected LDC's; and proposals for a new international economic order. Taught at a less technical level than ECON 122.

075. (AFAM 075, HIST 075) Africa to 1800.
Cassanelli. Fulfills History & Tradition Distribution Requirement.
Early civilizations, population movements, states and kingdoms, religions and cultures, the spread of Islam, and the era of the slave trade.

076. (AFAM 076, HIST 076) Africa Since 1800.
Mbembe. Fulfills History & Tradition Distribution Requirement.
This course will survey major themes, events, and personalities in African history from the early nineteenth century through the 1960's. Topics include abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, impact of colonial rule, African resistance, religious and cultural movements, rise of nationalism and pan-Africanism, issues of ethnicity and "tribalism" in modern Africa.

165. (AFAM 165, PSCI 465) Contemporary African Politics.
Callaghy.
A survey of politics in Africa focusing on the complex relationships between state, society, the economy, and external actors. Subjects covered include pre-colonial political institutions, colonial rule, the independence struggle, authoritarian and democratic statecraft, military rule, ethnicity, and class, with special attention to the politics of Africa's interrelated debt, economy, and development crises.

166. (AMES 468, RELS 114) The Religion of Ancient Egypt.
O'Connor, Silverman.
Weekly lectures (some of which will be illustrated) and a field trip to the University Museum's Egyptian Section. The multifaceted approach to the subject matter covers such topics as funerary literature and religion, cults, magic, religious art and architecture, and the religion of daily life.

AMES (TBA). Ancient African Civilizations: Egypt, Ethiopia, Nubia, Libya.
O'Connor.
(offered Spring, 1995/topic TBA).

SM 200. (HIST 200) Major Seminar in History.
Staff.

214. (AFAM 214, ANTH 514) Societies and Cultures of Africa.
Kopytoff.
An introduction to the peoples and cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa, including culture history, languages, traditional social and political structures, and traditional religion.

SM 232. (AFAM 232, FOLK 232) African Folklore Performance.
Staff.
This seminar examines recent developments in performance theory, ethnographic methods, and event-centered analysis useful for studying African expressive culture. Case studies from different regions of Africa will anchor discussions of oral literature, gender-based genres, African systems of thought, healing ritual, ethnoaesthetics, and the significance of folklore performance in African culture.

SM 290. (HIST 285, AFAM 295, PSCI 290) African Studies Proseminar: Introduction to African Studies.
Staff.
This course will provide an overview of interpretative trends and issues dealing with historical, ethnographic, economic, political, and cultural aspects of African life. The course is the introductory proseminar required for African Studies majors and minors. It will be team taught by faculty from a number of relevant departments.

298. Study Abroad.

305. (AFAM 305, FOLK 305, WSTD 305) Interpreting African Women's Lives.
Blakely.
This course critically examines the process of constructing and interpreting personal experience/life history narratives told by African women. Urban and rural women's narrative texts are considered as they inform our understanding of the nature of personal experience narrative, the role of collaborating researchers in life history production, and the significance of enabling African women to "speak for themselves." Further, these narratives will be studied for the insights they provide into African women's perspectives on family and work, cultural values, personal motivations, and social change.

SM 355. (AFAM 355, FOLK 355, WSTD 355) Women and Ritual in Africa.
Blakely.
Students will examine a wide range of ritual phenomena involving African women including spirit possession, spirit mediumship, semisecret association activities, healing processes, birth rituals, initiation, funerary events, other rites of passage, and Christian and Islamic movements. Topics to be considered include the constitution of gender roles through African ritual, significance of spirit possession and mediumship to folk practitioners, and the ethnoaesthetics of African ritual.

383. (HIST 383) Colonialism and Madness.
Mbembe.
The course will analyze the colonial experience in Africa within its historical and ideological context (concepts and theories, economics, relations between the colonizer and the colonized...). Borrowing from semantic analysis and symbolic anthropology, we will also re- interpret the dynamics of resistance movements against colonialism (problem of political obedience, complicity and accommodation, rites of violence, internal control, urban discipline and 'routinization' of behavior, healing, death and production of memory...). Particular attention will be given to the historical experiences of armed struggle (Cameroon, Kenya, Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Guinea- Bissau...).

385. (HIST 385) African Slave Trade.
Staff.
This course will survey the trade in slaves from Sub-Saharan Africa and explore its possible causes and consequences. It will examine the evolution of the trade scope, scale and organization; review the interpretations and controversies that dominate current scholarship; investigate the forces that may have shaped and sustained the slave trade; and consider the likely impact both of the trade itself and of its suppression.

410. (ARTH 410) African Art.
Staff.
A survey of the visual arts and material cultural traditions of Africa. The symbolism and complexity of traditional African art and material culture will be explored through the analysis of myth, ritual and cosmology.

423. (ARTH 423) Egyptian Art.
Pittman.
Survey of the art of ancient Egypt from the Predynastic Period through the end of the New Kingdom. Emphasis on major monuments of architecture, sculpture, relief and painting; questions of stylistic change and historical context.

430. (AFAM 430, FOLK 430) African Diasporic Folklore.
Abrahams.
A focus of the course is on the carryover of African traditions as they ar adapted, maintained, and developed upon in various European and New World African-American communities from village economics to cityscapes. Traditions as various as storytelling, playing Christmas and Carnival, and religious practices will be surveyed.

440. (AFAM 440, AMES 440) Intermediate Amharic I & II.
Staff. Prerequisite(s): For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor; AMES 240 or equivalent.
Offered through the Penn Language Center- See CGS Course Guide.

455. (AFAM 455, FOLK 455) African Folklore.
Ben-Amos.
A survey of the folklore of sub-Saharan African peoples; their myths, epics, tales, proverbs, riddles, and songs, examined both for their use and function in particular cultural contexts and for their literary quality.

460. (AMES 460) Middle Egyptian.
Silverman.
Introduction to the grammar of Middle Egyptian.

461. (AMES 461) Middle Egyptian Texts: Literary.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 460.
This course will deal with those texts of the Middle Kingdom that are written in the classical form of the language. It will include both monumental inscriptions, such as autobiographical stela inscriptions (P. Newberry, Beni Hassan) and stelae (Seth, Lesestucke) as well as narratives in prose (DeBuck, Reading Book). Religious texts (ibid. and Coffin Texts) will also be studied and analyzed. Distinctions between the grammar of the literary and non-literary genres will be discussed.

462. (AMES 462) Middle Egyptian Texts: Non-Literary.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 460.
The course will emphasize non-literary texts dating to Middle Kingdom: letters, reports, medical and mathematical papyri, and dialogues in tombs. The material will in large part be in the hieratic script, except for the tomb inscriptions.

466. (AMES 466) History of Ancient Egypt.
O'Connor.
Review and discussion of the principal aspects of ancient Egyptian history, 3000-500 BC.

467. (AMES 467) Introduction to Egyptian Culture and Archaeology.
O'Connor.
Covers principal aspects of ancient Egyptian culture (environment, urbanism, religion, technology, etc.) with special focus on archaeological data; includes study of University Museum artifacts.

468. (AMES 166, RELS 114) The Religion of Ancient Egypt.
O'Connor, Silverman.
Weekly lectures (some of which will be illustrated) and a field trip to the University Museum's Egyptian Section. The multifaceted approach to the subject matter covers such topics as funerary literature and religion, cults, magic, religious art and architecture, and the religion of daily life.

SM 487. (HIST 487) Religious Imagination in Colonial Africa in the 19th and 20th Century.
Mbembe.
This seminar will draw our attention to some of the conceptual problems that have recently surfaced in the social history of popular religions in colonial Africa. It will interpret religious movements in colonial Africa as key metaphors, sources and generators of prophetic discourses, processes of creation of knowledge and dreams, forms of reconstructive world-views for which we will designate the categories. Some key symbols and structures of prophetic thought and discourses will be examined, as well as the way the changes in the "profane" world gave rise to new, different (or re- invented) perceptions of the "sacred" and "power." This seminar is offered to both graduate and undergraduate students.

SM 507. (AFAM 507, HIST 507) Modern African History.
Cassanelli.
Selected topics in African history from the colonial occupation to independence. Emphasis on varieties of economic, religious, and cultural nationalism. Some knowledge of African history desirable.

509. (AMCV 509, HIST 509) Comparative Slavery: African and American Perspectives.
Cassanelli, Faust.
A historical and comparative examination of the institutional forms and cultural aspects of slavery in Africa and the Americas. Aims to introduce students to central issues in the historiography of slavery and the slave trade plus to develop a comparative approach utilizing insights from both Africanist and Americanist scholarship.

547. (AMES 547) Egypt & Canaan During the Bronze Age.
Staff.
Selected chapters in the history of cultural and economic interconnections between Egypt and Asia in the third and second millennia BCE. Course will focus on results of recent archaeological explorations in Israel, Sinai and Egypt.

560. (AMES 560) Late Egyptian.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 460.
Introduction to the grammar of Late Egyptian.

561. (AMES 561) Late Egyptian Texts: Literary.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 560.
This course will concentrate on the literary textsof the New Kingdom: Late Egyptian narratives such as The Doomed Prince, The Two Brothers, and Hours and Seth (Gardiner, Late Egyptian Stories) and poetry; (Gardiner, Chester Beatty I and Muller, Liebespoesie). The grammar will be analyzed (Erman, Neuagyptische Grammatik and Korostovtzev, Grammarie du Neo-Egyptian) and compared to that used in non-literary texts (Groll, The Negative Verbal System of Late Egyptian, Non-Verbal Sentence Patterns in Later Egyptian, and The Literary and Non-Literary Verbal Systems in Late Egyptian).

562. (AMES 562) Late Egyptian Texts: Non-Literary.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 560.
This course will concentrate on the translation and grammatical analysis of non-literary texts.

563. (AMES 563) Old Egyptian.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 560.
This course is an introduction to the language of the Egyptian Old Kingdom. The grammar of the period will be introduced during the early part of the semester, using Ededl's Altagyptische Grammatik as the basic reference. Other grammatical studies to be utilized will be include works by Allen, Baer, Polotsky, Satzinger, Gilula, Doret, and Silverman. The majority of time in the course will be devoted to reading varied textual material: the unpublished inscriptions in the tomb of the Old Kingdom official Kapure-- on view in the collection of the University Museum; several autobiographical inscriptions as recorded by Sethe in Urkunden I; and a letter in hieratic (Baer, ZAS 93, 1966, 1-9).

565. (AMES 565) Egyptian Artifacts.
O'Connor.
Detailed typological and chronological discussion of principal kinds of ancient Egyptian artifacts.

SM 569. (AMES 569) Problems in Ancient Egyptian History.
O'Connor.
In-depth analysis of specific historical issues and topics. Reading knowledge in French and German is required.

SM 572. (AFAM 572, ENGL 572) Topics in African Literature.
Staff.
This course is concerned with the context, and an aspect of the content and form, of African literature. It is based on a selection ofrepresentative texts written in English, as well as a few texts in English translation. It involves, first, a study of themes relating to social change and the persistence of cultural traditions, followed by an attempt at sketching the emergence of literary tradition by identifying some of the formal conventions established by the writers in their use of old forms and experiments with new.

614. (ANTH 614) Anthropology of Africa.
Kopytoff. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 514.
African culture history, as inferred from archaeology, linguistic relationships and ethnology. Culture areas of Africa and representative societies; common themes and differences; significance for anthropological concerns.

660. (AMES 660) Old Egyptian Texts: Religious.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 563.
This Course will examine the texts and grammar of religious and wisdom literature. The religious texts utilized will come from the spells of the Pyramid Texts (K. Sethe, Die Altagyptischen Pyramidentexts), and the offering formulae carved on the stelae and tomb walls. Sources from the latter will include published and unpublished material from Dendera, Giza, and other sites in the collections of the University Museum (H. Fischer, Dendera in the Third Millenium, B.C., C. Fisher, The Minor Cemeteries at Giza and W. Barta, Aufbau und Bedeutung der Altagyptischen Opferformel). For the wisdom literature, the texts of Kagemni (Jequier, Le Papyrus Prisse et Ses Variantes) and Prince Hordjedef (Brunner-Traut, ZAS 76 (1940), 3-9) will be read.

661. (AMES 661) Old Egyptian Texts: Secular.
Silverman. Prerequisite(s): AMES 563.
This course will concentrate on non-religious themes written in Old Egyptian. The texts utilized will include those written in the hieratic as well as hieroglyphic script; comparisons to and distinctions between the grammar used in these texts and those in the religious material will be made. The autobiographical inscriptions in tombs from Giza, Elephantine and Saqqara, (Sethe, Urkunden I) will be studied in addition to contemporaneous letters (Gunn, ASAE 25, (1925) 242-55, Gardiner and Sethe, Letters to the Dead, and P. Posener-Krieger, Hieratic Papyri in the British Museum) and economic documents (ibid. and Les Archivs du Temple Funeraire de Neferirkare-Kakai).

SM 701. (ANTH 701, AFAM 701, FOLK 701, HIST 701, COML 701) African Studies Seminar.
Staff.
Interdisciplinary seminar for discussion of issues of special interest to graduate students and faculty in African Studies. Topics vary according to the interests and expertise of instructors.

SM 777. (DEMG 777) Special Topics in African Demography.
McDaniel.
The topic of this course will be "Writings and Controversies in African Demography." The emphasis will be on recent readings, to reflect on-going discussions in the field. The course will focus on three different debates in African demography: issues and controversies in African Historical demography, family structure and fertility, and mortality.

African Languages

030. Elementary Arabic.
Staff.
For extended Arabic course listings please see the Penn Course Register.

125. (AFAM 125, LING 125) Elementary Hausa I.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

126. (AFAM 126, LING 126) Elementary Hausa II.
Mohammed. Prerequisite(s): LING 125 or permission of the instructor.
Offered through the Penn Language Center- See CGS Course Guide.

170. (AFAM 170, LING 170) Elementary Yoruba I.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

171. (AFAM 171, LING 171) Elementary Yoruba II.
Staff. Prerequisite(s): LING 170 or permission of the instructor.
Offered through the Penn Language Center- See CGS Course Guide.

180. (AFAM 180, LING 180) Elementary Swahili I.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

181. (AFAM 181, LING 181) Elementary Swahili II.
Staff. Prerequisite(s): LING 180.
Offered through the Penn Language Center- See CGS CourseGuide. Beginning level of Swahili which provides training and practice in speaking, reading and writing with initial emphasis on speaking and listening. Basic grammar, vocabulary and cultural skills learned gradually with priority on the spoken language. Especially during the second term folktales, other texts and films will be used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture.

185. (AFAM 185, LING 185) Elementary Swahili: Accelerated.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide. One term intensive course covering the materials given in Swahili 180 and 181. Course provides training and practice in speaking, reading and writing with initial emphasis on speaking and listening. Basic grammar, vocabulary and cultural skills learned gradually with priority on the spoken language. Folktales, other texts and films will be used to help introduce important aspects of Swahili culture.

240. (AFAM 240, AMES 240) Elementary Amharic I & II.
Staff. Prerequisite(s): For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor.
Offered through the Penn Language Center- See CGS Course Guide.

270. (AFAM 270, LING 270) Intermediate Yoruba.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

280. (AFAM 280, LING 280) Intermediate Swahili I.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

281. (AFAM 282, LING 282) Intermediate Swahili II.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

284. (AFAM 284, LING 284) Advanced Swahili I.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

285. (AFAM 285, LING 285) Advanced Swahili II.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

490. (LING 490) African Language Tutorial.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide.

491. (LING 491) African Language Tutorial II.
Staff.
Offered through the Penn Language Center-See CGS Course Guide..

Africa-Related Courses

(Not Cross-Listed with African Studies)

Afro-American Studies (AFAM)

SM 281. (COML 325, ENGL 281, WSTD 281) Topics in Afro-American Literature.
Staff.
Spaces will be reserved for English Majors. In the past the course has addressed itself to topics as diverse as "Afro-American Autobiography," "Backgrounds of Afro-American Literature," including examination of oral narratives, black Christianity, and Afro- American music, and "The Black Narrative," beginning with 18th century slave narratives and working toward contemporary literature.

530. (AMCV 530, FOLK 530) Afro-American Folklore.
Roberts.
A historical survey of Afro-American folklore from the slave period to the present including spirituals, folktales, ballads, jokes, folk beliefs, proverbs, the dozens, and toasts. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between folklore and the black social and cultural experience in the United States.

SM 570. (COML 573, ENGL 570) Afro-American Literature.
Baker.
This course will employ African, Caribbean, and Afro-American literary works to illustrate modes and strategies of literary representation common to Neo- African and Diasporan (New World) authors. Readings will include selected autobiographies, novels, plays, and poems.

Anthropology (ANTH)

150. (ANTH 150) Women's Health, and Development.
Huss-Ashmore. Fulfills the Living World Distribution Requirement.
Introduction to the problems of international development as these affect women in the third world. Emphasizes impact of cultural change on women's roles in production and reproduction. Views women's health as the outcome of interacting biological, physical, and social processes.

325. New Themes in Anthropology.

SM 327. Topics in Medical Anthropology.
Huss-Ashmore.
Method and theory in biocultural anthropology applied to current issues in human health, including nutrition, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on structure and analysis of data.

509. (AFAM 409) Art and Material Culture.
Staff.
This course will introduce anthropological approaches to art and material culture. It will cover such topics as the history of material culture studies in anthropology; the recent resurgence of interest in material culture studies; definitions of art and material culture; technology and culture; objects and identity; objects and change; and museums and their role in collecting, producing and representing cultures. The course will also provide students with a working knowledge of material culture research in the museum setting through projects in the Africa section of the University Museum.

528. Topics in Medical Anthropology.
Staff.
Method and theory in biocultural anthropology applied to current issues in human health, including nutrition, growth and reproduction. Emphasis on structure and analysis of data.

553. Political Anthropology.
Barnes.
Political systems of non-Western societies and theories about these systems analyzed and compared from an anthropological perspective.

SM 559. Nutritional Anthropology.
Huss-Ashmore.
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 003 and 103 or permission of instructor. Consideration of human nutrition and nutritional status within context of physical anthropology. Particular emphasis on role of physical anthropologist in analysis of human biological/nutritional interactions in terms of both effects upon individual and underlying factors and correlates.

591. Demographic Anthropology.
Huss-Ashmore.
Population issues and demographic methods from ananthropological perspective. Processes of demographic change in modern, historic, and prehistoric human populations. Emphasizes demography as an aspect of human population ecology.

SM 635. Aesthetic Anthropology.
Staff.
Through in-depth readings and discussions, students will become familiar with the major approaches that have been used in the study of arts and aesthetics in anthropology. Topics will include cross- cultural definitions of arts and their applicability; Functionalist, Structuralist, Marxist and psycho-biological approaches to arts and aesthetics; and politics.

Art History (ARTH)

424. Egyptian and Mesopotamian Art.
Pittman.

Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (AMES)

SM 060. Art amd Writing/Ancient Egypt.
Silverman. Fulfills History & Tradition Distribution Requirement. Freshman Seminar.
The course will introduce the student to the mind of "ancient man" through the achievements of the ancient cultures of Egypt and the Near East. Using all the genres of writing (literature, historical records, autobiographies, religious texts), art, and architecture as sources of study, the student will receive an insight into the image of ancient life. Special emphasis will be on ancient Egypt.

City and Regional Planning

737. (GAFL 737, IDAT 614) Urban Development for Third World Countries.
Hoek-Smit
This course will give a historical/developmental perspective of urban problems in societies with different soci-economic structures, and will detail current practices in the development of residential areas. Issues involved in policy formulation and program/project design of urban residential areas will be addressed; economic factors (demand, supply, pricing), social structure and demographic factors (housing need, segregation, cultural factors, household structure, behavior patterns, etc.).

Demography (DEMG)

607. (SOCI 607) Introduction to Demography.
Van de Walle.
A nontechnical introduction to fertility, mortality, migration and urbanization, and the interrelations of population with other social and economic factors.

Education (EDUC)

810. Cultural Perspectives on Human Development.
Wagner.
Seminar on cultural influences on socialization and cognitive development. Special topics may include literacy, infancy, aging, sex-roles, traditional pedagogies.

817. Human Development and National Development in the Third World.
Wagner. Prerequisite(s): Prior graduate work in related areas.
This seminar will cover a number of topics in human development (e.g., pre-school interventions, literacy campaigns, non-formal education) in the Third World that have received attention from researchers and policy planners (e.g., UNICEF, UNESCO, World Bank, AID).

Energy Management and Policy (ENMG)

602. (CPLN 602, IDAT 610) Bioenergy Problems in Developing Countries.
Hosier.
This course focuses on the bioenergy problems of developing countries. It begins with an assessment of tropical environments planning, specific energy technologies, energy technologies, and production techniques.

643. (IDAT 616) Energy & Environmental Development Workshop.
Hosier.
This course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in environmental problems of developing countries. Among the topics to be covered are deforestation, desertification and soil erosion; famine and drought; pollution and the environmental implications of urbanization. Students will be required to write a detailed research paper on a topic of their choice relating to the subject matter of the course.

English (ENGL)

(AFAM 090, WSTD 090) Topics in Women and Literature.
Staff. Fulfills Arts & Letters Distribution Requirement.
This course is a comparative study of black women writers in Africa and the Americas. We will examine select works of Afro-American and Caribbean fiction in the context of literary history and modern culture. We will explore thematic, structural and stylistic similarities among these works through lectures, class discussion and papers.

Folklore and Folklife (FOLK)

203. (AFAM 203) Introduction to Afro-American Folklore.
Roberts. Fulfills History & Tradition Distribution Requirement.
This course is designed to provide undergraduates with an overview of the major forms of expressive culture developed by Afro-Americans. We will focus on the continuous development of black cultural expression from slavery to the present, emphasizing the socio-historical context in which they are to be understood and interpreted. We will also examine manifestations and interpretations of black oral traditions in the literary works of a few selected Afro-American writers.

503. Issues in Folklore Theory.
St. George.
An introduction to folklore for graduate students, concentrating upon certain key issues in the theory and history of the discipline.

531. (COML 560) Prose Narrative.
Ben-Amos.
The topics of discussion in the course are the following: the nature of narrative, narrative taxonomy and terminology, performance in storytelling events, the transformation of historical experience into narrative, the construction of symbolic reality, the psycho-social interpretation of folktales, the search for the minimal units, the historic-geographic method in folktale studies, the folktale in history and the history of folktale research.

SM 629. (COML 662, RELS 605) Theories of Myth.
Ben-Amos.
This course will consist of seminar discussions of seminal thinkers about myth, like Lvi-Strauss, Dumezil, and others, and particular issues in relationship to myth such as language, history, psychology and ritual.

French (FREN)

SM 390. Litterature Francophone (includes Africa).
Moudileno.
A brief introduction about the stages of French colonialism and its continuing political and cultural consequences, and then reading in various major works--novels, plays, poems-- in French by authors from Quebec, the Caribbean, Africa (including the Maghreb), etc. Of interest to majors in International Relations, Anthropology and African Studies as well as majors in French.

History (HIST)

010. (AFAM 010) The World 900-1750.
Farriss. Fulfills History & Tradition Distribution Requirement.
Fall: 1400-1750: Afro-Eurasian civilizations, agrarian empires and their interactions; the rise of trans-Atlantic economies and European seaborne empires; the slave trade, Afro-American and colonial societies in Spanish America, the Caribbean, and Brazil.

011. The World- 1750-Present.
Ludden. Fulfills History & Tradition Distribution Requirement.
Having surveyed the history of western imperialism from 1750 to the present, this course considers the imperial impact on Asia, Africa, and Latin America, through comparative studies of popular protests from local riots to national and revolutionary movements.

SM 100. Pre-Majors Seminar.
Staff.

SM 581. (ANTH 581) Colonialism and Cultural Change.
Farriss.
Comparative analysis of colonialism as a system of values, world-views, and social relations. Emphasis is on European rule in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, from mercantile to industrialcapitalism. Topics include: mutual perceptions of colonizers and colonized, concepts and representations of power and authority, Christianity and indigenous religious systems, cultural dimensions of the introduction of new technologies and systems of production and exchange.

615. (COML 615) Colonialism, Culture and Power.
Farriss.
Colonialism as symbolization. Explores the relationship between power and our ways of organizing experiences or making sense of the world. Emphasis is on language and its uses, under such labels as discourse, interpretation, and narrative.

History and Sociology of Science

325. In Search of Origins.
Kuklick.
The impact of contact with non-Western peoples on Western social thought, from the era of European imperialist expansion to the present. The interpretation of the behavior of "primitive" peoples as manifestation of basic human nature, with implications for economic, political, and psychological theory.

516. Scientific Evolution and Enlightenment.
Sivin.
Science, technology, and medicine 1600-1830; primary sources, historiography, and important recent scholarship.

International Development and Appropriate Technology (IDAT)

SM 614. (CPLN 737, GAFL 737) Urban Planning for Developing Countries.
Hoek-Smit.
This course will give a historical/developmental perspective of urban problems in societies with different socio-economic structures, and will detail current practices in the development of residential areas. Issues involved in policy formulation and program/project design of urban residential areas will be addressed; economic factors (demand, supply, pricing), social structural and demographic factors (housing need, segregation), cultural factors (household structure, behavior patterns, etc.), industrial location and transportation (site selection andplanning), environmental and climatic factors (house design, site and sanitation planning).

Music (MUSC)

022. (ANTH 022, FOLK 022) World Music and Cultures.
Wong. Fulfills Arts & Letters Distribution Requirement.
Open to all students. Draws on repertories of various societies from Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas to examine relations between aesthetic productions and social processes. We investigate musical sounds, cultural logics informing those sounds, and the social strategies of performance. Topics may include indigenous music theories, music and social organization, symbolic expressions and musical meaning, gender, religion, and social change.

105. (ANTH 111, FOLK 105) Anthropology of Music.
Roseman. Fulfills Arts & Letters Distribution Requirement.
Introduction to anthropological approaches to music, with study of musical theories, cultural life and performance contexts in selected non-western and western repertories.

SM 605. (ANTH 605, COML 605, FOLK 605) Anthropology of Music.
Wong.
Theories and methods of the ethnomusicological approach to the study of music in culture, applied to selected western and non-western performance contexts.

Nursing

516. International Nutrition: Political Economics World Health.
Hlatshawayo.
The nutritional problems of the less developed countries are discussed in the context of basic human needs. The major forms of malnutrition related to poverty and their underlying causes are covered.

Political Science (PSCI)

116. Political Change in the Third World.
Callaghy. Fulfills Society Distribution Req.
A survey of the political structures and processes of the countries of the Third World. It will focus on: (1) contending theoretical perspectives aboutmodernization and development, dependency and underdevelopment, and state-centric; (2) colonial rule and its legacy; (3) Third World societies and economics; (4) authoritarian and democratic statecraft; (5) the military; (6) culture and politics; (7) external actors; and (8) protest and revolution.

SM 532. The Political Economy of North-South Relations.
Callaghy.
An analysis of the politics of the Third World debt crises and efforts at economic reform; the New International Economic Order of the 1970's; nature of the international political economy, including the rise and fall of "hegemons," the international state system and international organizations; development strategies; trade, finance, and investment issues; and the nature of political economy as a body of theory.

533. Comparative Political and Economic Change.
Callaghy.
A comparative exploration of the politics and economics of the formation of states and the development of capitalism, both historical and contemporary, and an examination of contending theoretical perspectives about them. Examples will be taken from Europe since the Sixteenth century, Nineteenth and Twentieth century Latin America and Asia, and contemporary Africa.

Religious Studies (RELS)

117. (AFAM 117) Black Religion in America.
Washington.
The meaning of black religion, its social ideas and ideals, its impact in the public arena and its leadership in politics will be examined from historical, sociological and religious perspectives.

118. (AFAM 118) Black Sects and Cults.
Washington.
Examination of selected non-traditional Black American religious and secular movements, their founders and leaders with close consideration of the contrasts between these groups and more traditional movements. Examples include such cult leaders as "Daddy Grace," "Father Divine," and "The Reverend Ike" as compared with other religious and social leaders such as Martin Luther King and Jesse Jackson.


Editor: Ali B. Ali-Dinar
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Editor: sisskind@sas.upenn.edu